Showing: 1 - 10 of 21 RESULTS

How to Make Fruit Shrubs

A mason jar of dark pink liquid sits on a porch wall

Shrubs are a great way to preserve fruit when you don’t have the time or energy for canning. It’s also suitable for fruit that’s a little past its prime that you wouldn’t want to can anyway. I often make shrubs with the tail ends of a fruit crop, or after a foraging trip where I managed to grab a few handfuls of berries but not enough for a major cooking project

dock seed crackers

How to Make Dock Seed Crackers

Curly dock (rumex crispus, although many dock species will work as well) seed is easily identifiable from mid-Summer through Fall by its tall spikes of rust-brown seeds. It is often growing in large patches near agricultural fields or other disturbed areas. By grabbing the plant at the base of the seed head and stripping the seeds off into a bag, it’s easy to collect a lot in a short amount of time.

nettle powder

How to Make Nettle Matcha Powder

Ah nettle, one of foraging’s finest but most polarizing ambassadors. Nettle (urtica dioica) is incredibly nutritious, containing many vitamins and minerals such as Vitamins A and C, calcium, iron, and a rich array of fatty and amino acids. Stinging nettle has been used all over the globe as a source of food and medicine for centuries, and there’s substantial research backing up its numerous health benefits.

beeswax salve

How to Make a Beeswax Salve

Working in a greenhouse and on a farm where they go from wet to dry, dirty to scrubbed clean, and bitterly cold to warm throughout the day, my hands go through Hell in the Spring and often look like it. Regular lotions don’t do much since they instantly get wiped or washed off, but I have found that a thick application of beeswax salve keeps the cracking at bay.